Girl, 13, is rushed to hospital after suffering a severe allergic reaction to a BATH BOMB that contained milk

  • Emelia Brain, from Staffordshire in the West Midlands, suffered allergic reaction  
  • Milk was listed on the product’s ingredients but parents say it should be in bold 
  • She was taken to New Cross Hospital in Wolverhampton where she recovered

A 13-year-old girl was left fighting for her life in hospital after using a bathbomb she later discovered contained milk.

Emelia Brain, from Staffordshire in the West Midlands, cried for help from the bathroom moments after she got into the water on January 15. 

Her parents rushed in when they heard she was in pain and found her gasping for air.

Emilia had used the Unicorn Christmas Bath Bomb from the Bomb Cosmetics brand that she had recently received for Christmas. 

Emelia Brain (pictured), 13, was left fighting for her life in hospital after using a bathbomb she later discovered contained milk

Emilia then used her inhaler and an ambulance was called which arrived in within five minutes to take her to New Cross Hospital in Wolverhampton.   

Doctors administered shots of antihistamine and adrenaline and she was reassured that she would recover.

Emelia’s father Scott then read the bathbomb’s packet to discover it had milk in – something she is severely allergic to. 

However her known allergens such as milk were not written in bold, which they are on food products. 

Emilia (pictured) had used the Unicorn Christmas Bath Bomb from the Bomb Cosmetics brand that she had recently received for Christmas

Emelia (pictured with her younger sister Elisia) has always had to be careful about what she eats and what cosmetic products she uses 

Now the family are campaigning for allergens on cosmetic products to be written in bold, so people can avoid coming into contact with potentially deadly ingredients. Emilia and Elisia, eight, are pictured

Her mother Maria told The Mirror: ‘What if we have been down stairs with the door shut?

WHAT IS A DAIRY ALLERGY?

A dairy allergy is when the body’s immune system reacts unusually to dairy.

Reactions to dairy, like other triggers, are usually mild, causing red rashes, itches, swelling and even vomiting.

However, they can prove deadly and lead to anaphylactic shock – which can kill in minutes.

It leads to a catastrophic drop in blood pressure and can trigger a cardiac arrest – when the heart suddenly stops working.

About 20 people in the UK die as a result of anaphylactic shock each year, according to figures.

Experts are unsure how many people have a dairy allergies, but claim they are one of the most common types of allergies.

The NHS advises patients with a dairy allergy, or allergies to other potential triggers such as peanuts, to avoid the food completely.

Dairy allergy is different to lactose intolerance, which is a common digestive problem to lactose – often found in milk.

‘She could have been in the house by herself. I don’t think she would have stood a chance.

‘The reaction was so fast because she was ingesting the steam.

Emelia has always had to be careful about what she eats and what cosmetic products she uses. 

She first discovered her allergies when she kissed her mother Maria after she had eaten a yogurt and her face puffed up.  

Tests then revealed that she was allergic to dairy products and that she also had asthma.    

Along with her sister Elisia, eight, Emelia makes videos for her Youtube channel about living life with allergies.  

Now the family are campaigning for allergens on cosmetic products to be written in bold, so people can avoid coming into contact with potentially deadly ingredients.

It comes after the tragic case of Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, who collapsed and died after eating a Pret baguette which did not mention sesame seeds in its ingredients list in 2016. 

Bomb Cosmetics has been contacted for a comment.  

To sign the family’s petition click here. 

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