Freddie Mercury: Peter Freestone discusses photo with cats

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Cats normally choose the warmest spots in the house to enjoy. You may notice your cat loves to snuggle up in confined, warm spaces or will quickly jump into your seat as soon as you get up. While yes, cats do love warmth, heat can be damaging to their health. Make sure you take precautions to avoid your furry friend getting dehydrated or sunburnt.

Cats love the warmth, but the hotter it gets, the more likely they are to suffer from heat-related illnesses.

Surprising to most people is the fact that cats can get sunburnt, with those with white ears and faces particularly susceptible.

If you’ve got a white cat, take precautions by applying a high factor sun cream liberally to their ears and faces as you can’t trust them to stay in the shade.

When your cat doesn’t take in enough fluid through drinking or eating wet food, they can become dehydrated.

This is even more likely to happen when temperatures heat up.

According to the Cats Protection Society, you can tell when a cat is dehydrated if:

  • Gums are sticky or tacky
  • Skin is no longer elastic – in a well-hydrated cat the skin you snap back into place immediately
  • The cat’s eyes are severely sunken
  • The paws feel cool or cold

How to keep indoor cats cool in hot weather

Blue Cross has provided tips for keeping indoor cats cool and safe this summer as temperatures are on the up.

Make sure your cat has access to fresh, cool water, and if it’s a particularly hot day, change the water two or three times to avoid it warming up.

Provide shade wherever you can for your cat to relax.

Make some ice lollies for your cat by freezing some tune brine or low-salt chicken stock for a cool snack that will keep them both entertained and refreshed.

DON’T MISS
Dognappers threatened with tougher punishments under new law [INSIGHT]
Fears eagles will kill piglets, lambs and cats amid UK reintroduction  [REPORT]
How to keep your garden safe for pets – FIVE dangerous spring flowers [EXPLAINED]

Put up screens and netting at windows and balcony doors to prevent pets falling out.

If you live in a city and have a balcony, get some netting to secure the premises and let your pet roam free in their very own cat-io.

Provide a cooling mat for your cat to lay on, or put freezer blocks or ice packs – well wrapped in a blanket or tea towel – in your cat’s favourite spot.

If your feline pal is especially fluffy, daily grooming will help get rid of excess hair that often traps heat.

Caroline Ray, Head of Veterinary services at Blue Cross, said: “It’s important to make sure your pet is in a well ventilated or cooled down room, as they can easily overheat, and that they have access ton water at all times, especially older cats.

“Blue Cross’s animal hospitals regularly treat cases of cats falling from heights, resulting in broken bones and internal injuries which can prove fatal.

“We would warn owners to be mindful when they have windows and doors open, and to put up screens or netting to protect their pets.”

Source: Read Full Article