Sophie Countess of Wessex fought back tears as she discussed how the Royal Family were dealing with the death of Prince Philip.

In a candid interview with Naga Munchetty on BBC Radio 5 Live this morning, the Countess, who is married to Prince Edward, Prince Philip's youngest son, told how the grieving process had been difficult due to the pandemic.

She said: “Well he has left a giant sized hole in our lives.

“Unfortunately, the pandemic has slightly slewed things in as much as, it’s hard to spend as much time with the Queen than we would like to.

“We’ve been trying to, but of course, it’s still not that easy.”

Prince Edward's wife continued: “I think the whole grieving process is probably likely for us, to take a lot longer.

“It’s only when you do the normal things that you would have done with them and you suddenly realise they are not there that you really start to have a ‘oh my goodness’ moment.”

She became really emotional as she discussed a recent trip to Scotland over the half-term and a photograph she took of Philip and the Queen in the country back in 2003.

She said: “I was pregnant with Louise at the time and we went up there during half-term.”

Naga then interrupted, asking: “Are you okay?”.

Sophie replied “Hmm”: adding "and just to be there, in that place, was an ‘Oh my God’ moment. So I think they’ll come and go.

“But you have to let them come and let them go. But just talking to you now, it’s a bit of a ‘oh my goodness’ moment, which you don’t necessarily expect and you don’t expect them to come.”

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She added: “There will be lots of moments like that, but it’s good to remember.”

As her voice began to crack, Naga was then forced to ask her if she was "ok to continue", to which she replied "yes".

The Countess also discussed her work to support victims of rape and sexual violence in war in the interview.

She also told how she reckons it is vitally important awareness is raised on the subject and there is an open conversation about it.

During her chat the Countess emphasised how important it is that the topic remains on the global agenda.

Discussing when she spoke with a survivor of rape in war, Sophie said: “This lady was, I’m guessing, probably in her 70s … but the country I was in had conflict going back for generations and so I wasn’t sure whether or not she was going to talk to me. But all of a sudden she got up slowly, and wanted to speak to me. And she opened her mouth and started to tell me exactly what had happened.

"I don’t want to shock your listeners at all, but it was really upsetting. Truly upsetting. I feel in a way, it was really important for me to hear the actual reality, because as much as the information that I have is written down on pieces of paper with statistics and, you know, individual statistics but more broader statistics as well, it’s very dry in its nature.

"When you hear somebody’s story of gang rape and literally physically what has happened to them, it absolutely brings you to your knees. And I had tears falling off my face as she was talking to me. I was completely silent, but I was just in floods of tears.”

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